When A Blue Jay Isn’t Just Blue

Here is a photographic collection, so far, of all the “jays” I’ve seen in the world. Seven of the eight come from the Western Hemisphere, but one is from India and is called the Indian Tree Pie. We’ll start with him:

Indian Tree Pie (dendrocitta vagabunda)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next we have the common Blue Jay that most people in the eastern half of the United States have in their yards at some point:

Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For those of you in the Western half of the United States you are probably used to this character, the Western Scrub Jay:

Western Scrub Jay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also to be found in the west, but at high altitudes are two other jays, first Clark’s Nutcracker:

Clark's Nutcracker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And second, the Steller’s Jay, one of which I saw in the Davis Mountains in Texas last week, which is a rare occurence, to say the least:

Steller's Jay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In South Texas two species of jays are to be found, one very common, and one very rare. The commoner bird is the Green Jay and he is spectacular:

Green Jay (Cyanocorax yncas)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The less common bird is the Brown Jay and while he looks brown and boring, he’s three times the size of the Blue Jay or the Scrub Jay and has three times the character:

Brown Jay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lastly, is the fantastic bird I saw in Nicaragua, the White-throated Magpie Jay:

White-throated Magpie Jay

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are many more species of jays and hope someday to see them all.

2 Responses to “When A Blue Jay Isn’t Just Blue”

  1. Lea Booth

    You have some fabulous bird photos and what I can only deduce is an incredibly long life-list of birds. Thanks for sharing your discoveries.

  2. Sean Paul

    Lea, it’s a substantial list, but by no means super long. I’ve got 400 of the birds in Texas and another 350 globally I suppose. So, 750? That’s not much considering that this year’s ABA Big Year Winner had 750 in the United States alone. http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/01/02/birding-sport-big-year-citizen-science/4261529/

    And let me stress, these photos are all luck. I did not set out to find any of these birds. I just wanted to be outside and see what showed up. :-)

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