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Amortization Bond Calculator

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Rick Said:

Finance Management?

We Answered:

There are many on the web, consder the sources below,

or do a yahoo search on "bank loan" and "mortgage bond" seperately with "amortization" and "calculator" as additional keywords

Tonya Said:

What is Loan Amortization?

We Answered:

In banking and finance, an amortizing loan is a loan where the principal of the loan is paid down over the life of the loan, according to some amortization schedule, typically through equal payments.

Similarly, an amortizing bond is a bond that repays part of the principal (face value) along with the coupon payments.

Each payment to the lender will consist of a portion of interest and a portion of principal. Mortgage loans are typically amortizing loans. The calculations for an amortizing loan are those of an annuity using the time value of money formulas, and can be done using an amortization calculator

An amortizing loan should be contrasted with a bullet loan, where a large portion of the loan will be paid at the final maturity date instead of being paid down gradually over the loan's life.

Peggy Said:

I cant figure out if i have done the Amortization table right, can someone show me if i did it right?

We Answered:

Try this calculator - free

http://www.bretwhissel.net/amortization/…

Barry Said:

Can you define amortization in mortgage?

We Answered:

< Amortization is the reduction of a debt incurred, for example, in the purchase of stocks or bonds, by regular payments consisting of interest and part of the principal made over a specified time period upon the expiration of which the entire debt is repaid. A mortgage is amortized when it is repaid with periodic payments over a particular term. After a certain portion of each payment is applied to the interest on the debt, any balance reduces the principal.http://www.answers.com/amortization

Check out the site below.
(Amortization schedule calculator)
(Calculate your payment and more)
http://www.bankrate.com/gookeyword/amort…

Felicia Said:

Present and Future Values Question...Please help!!!?

We Answered:

I,m no financial expert, but I'll give this a go. This is like a speadsheet type of problem. The arithmatic is not hard, but there is a lot of repetition of simple math problems. You have to make a grid of numbers like a spreadsheet to get the three answers.
Start by numbering the lines on your page 35-60 for Joes' age. Next make a column with Joe's salery at age 35 he just got the job at $200,000. For age 36 it is 200,000 +5% of 200,000.
I would do 200,000 x 1.05 Whatever this number is, write it in the column, and multiply it by the 1.05 to get the next , and so on.
The next colunm is yearly savings before intrest. since Joe is investing 5% of his salery, start with the 200,000 at age 35 multiply 200,000 x .05 Then multiply that number by.07 to get yearly savings with intrest. (put these numbers in a new column) continue multipplying each of Joes' yearly saleries by .05, then multiply by .07 till the coumn is filled.

Q 1. This question puzzles me, because if it is taken literally, the answer is simply $0, because Joe's job is "new". This means he has not earned any of his $200,000 yearly salery yet.
Q 2. add all the numbers in the last column to get the answer.
Q 3.
This is an amortization. There is a formula for this, but most people use a financial calculator such as the HP12-C or a website based amortization program. A quick websearch should turn up many options. Google the word "amortization" to find some programs online.
Plug in the following values:
present value= The answer to Q 2
future value = $0
# of payments=20
intrest=7%
The unknown variable(unknown in that it is the one you are looking for) is the amount of payment.
I hope this helps you instead of confusing you further. Typicaly a teacher does not give such dificult problems without preparing the students properly. If the teacher just dropped this in your lap without covering simple intrest calculations, and amortization, then SHAME, SHAME SHAME on them.

Roland Said:

What is the difference between sinking funds and Amortization?

We Answered:

In modern finance, a sinking fund is a method by which an organization sets aside money over time to retire its indebtedness. More specifically, it is a fund into which money can be deposited, so that over time its preferred stock, debentures or stocks can be retired. For the organisation retiring debt, it has the benefit that the principal of the debt or at least part of it, will be available when due. For the creditors, the fund reduces the risk the organization will default when the principal is due.

In some US states, Michigan for example, school districts may ask the voters to approve a taxation for the purpose of establishing a Sinking Fund. The State Treasury Department has strict guidelines for expenduture of fund dollars with the penalty for misuse being an eternal ban on ever seeking the tax levy again. See also sinking fund provision in bonds.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinking_fu…

Amortization

Amortization is the distribution of a single lump-sum cash flow into many smaller cash flow installments, as determined by an amortization schedule. Unlike other repayment models, each repayment installment consists of both principal and interest. Amortization is chiefly used in loan repayments (a common example being a mortgage) and in sinking funds. Payments are divided into equal amounts for the duration of the loan, making it the simplest repayment model. A greater amount of the payment is applied to interest at the beginning of the amortization schedule, while more money is applied to principal at the end.

The amortization calculator formula is: (1-vn)/r, where n = number of years, v = 1/(1+r), and r = interest rate / 100.

Divide by (1+r) if a payment is due at the beginning.

Another method of writing this kind of formula is:



where: P = principal amount borrowed i = periodic interest rate m = number of periods each year (vs."t"= number of periods over the life of the loan, or t=n*m) A = periodic payment.

Negative amortization (also called deferred interest) occurs if the payments made do not cover the interest due. The remaining interest owed is added to the outstanding loan balance, making it larger than the original loan amount. Your Ad Here

Discuss It!

roy said:

Can the face value of the Bond be reduced due to Amortization or Sinking Funds