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Hack Credit Card Number

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Jeff Said:

Can anyone get my credit card number from itunes?

We Answered:

Delete form data in your browser, that should clear traces of the number on your computer.

Leslie Said:

It is possible for someone to ''hack'' your credit card with only pieces of information?

We Answered:

If you're buying on an untrusted site, anything is possible including taking the credit card information you supply to make the purchase as a means to use your card fraudulently. This would not be a "hack", it would be handing the information over on a silver platter.

That said, there have been instances when legitimate online databases have been hacked and credit card information from customers stolen. This happened to us twice, not directly, but we had our accounts closed by the creditor and new cards issued due to database hacks.

Jessica Said:

I Found This HACKED Credit Card Number On Youtube And Used It To Order A PS3 From Gamestop But iCancelled?

We Answered:

you could see some jail time if they trace the number back to you for fraud on a hacked credit card no matter you stopped it or not

Francis Said:

Can This Person Really Hack My Xbox Live Account And Get My Credit Card Number?

We Answered:

No When somebody freezes your xbox 360 It is just a kind of glitch

This is how the person froze your xbox

Step 1.The person invited you to a party
Step 2.Sent you a voice message
Step 3.Kicked you out the party while you were reading the message and then your xbox 360 freezes

Yolanda Said:

hackers stealing other peoples credit card number and social security?

We Answered:

its called data bases.Not person pc's.Likely not to get much.
the thing with Home users is to just redirect traffic to a new site.
that's how to make the money.very easy and very hard to detect.
but keyloggers or fake login pages will work.Watch your Url.some sites will look like the original,But is not.

Emily Said:

iF SOMEONE hacks credit card number and buy things online but he stays in another country what can be done?

We Answered:

You need to contact the credit card company right away. You are not liable for charges that are fradulent. You need to also contact the three credit reporting agencies so they can flag your reports.

Info on what to do and who to contact is here:

http://ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/credit/i…

Remedying the Effects of Identity Theft
You are receiving this information because you have notified a consumer reporting
agency that you believe that you are a victim of identity theft. Identity theft occurs when
someone uses your name, Social Security number, date of birth, or other identifying information,
without authority, to commit fraud. For example, someone may have committed identity theft by
using your personal information to open a credit card account or get a loan in your name. For
more information, visit www.consumer.gov/idtheft or write to: FTC, Consumer Response
Center, Room 130-B, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C., 20580.
The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) gives you specific rights when you are, or believe
that you are, the victim of identity theft. Here is a brief summary of the rights designed to help
you recover from identity theft.
1. You have the right to ask that nationwide consumer reporting agencies place “fraud
alerts” in your file to let potential creditors and others know that you may be a victim of
identity theft. A fraud alert can make it more difficult for someone to get credit in your
name because it tells creditors to follow certain procedures to protect you. It also may
delay your ability to obtain credit. You may place a fraud alert in your file by calling just
one of the three nationwide consumer reporting agencies. As soon as that agency
processes your fraud alert, it will notify the other two, which then also must place fraud
alerts in your file.
C Equifax: 1-800-525-6285; www.equifax.com
C Experian: 1-888-EXPERIAN (397-3742); www.experian.com
C TransUnion: 1-800-680-7289; www.transunion.com
An initial fraud alert stays in your file for at least 90 days. An extended alert stays in your
file for seven years. To place either of these alerts, a consumer reporting agency will
require you to provide appropriate proof of your identity, which may include your Social
Security number. If you ask for an extended alert, you will have to provide an identity
theft report. An identity theft report includes a copy of a report you have filed with a
federal, state, or local law enforcement agency, and additional information a consumer
reporting agency may require you to submit. For more detailed information about the
identity theft report, visit www.consumer.gov/idtheft.
2. You have the right to free copies of the information in your file (your “file
disclosure”). An initial fraud alert entitles you to a copy of all the information in your
file at each of the three nationwide agencies, and an extended alert entitles you to two free
file disclosures in a 12-month period following the placing of the alert. These additional
disclosures may help you detect signs of fraud, for example, whether fraudulent accounts
have been opened in your name or whether someone has reported a change in your
address. Once a year, you also have the right to a free copy of the information in your file
at any consumer reporting agency, if you believe it has inaccurate information due to
fraud, such as identity theft. You also have the ability to obtain additional free file
disclosures under other provisions of the FCRA. See www.ftc.gov/credit.
3. You have the right to obtain documents relating to fraudulent transactions made or
accounts opened using your personal information. A creditor or other business must
give you copies of applications and other business records relating to transactions and
accounts that resulted from the theft of your identity, if you ask for them in writing. A
business may ask you for proof of your identity, a police report, and an affidavit before
giving you the documents. It also may specify an address for you to send your request.
Under certain circumstances, a business can refuse to provide you with these documents.
See www.consumer.gov/idtheft.
4. You have the right to obtain information from a debt collector. If you ask, a debt
collector must provide you with certain information about the debt you believe was
incurred in your name by an identity thief – like the name of the creditor and the amount
of the debt.
5. If you believe information in your file results from identity theft, you have the right
to ask that a consumer reporting agency block that information from your file. An
identity thief may run up bills in your name and not pay them. Information about the
unpaid bills may appear on your consumer report. Should you decide to ask a consumer
reporting agency to block the reporting of this information, you must identify the
information to block, and provide the consumer reporting agency with proof of your
identity and a copy of your identity theft report. The consumer reporting agency can
refuse or cancel your request for a block if, for example, you don’t provide the necessary
documentation, or where the block results from an error or a material misrepresentation
of fact made by you. If the agency declines or rescinds the block, it must notify you.
Once a debt resulting from identity theft has been blocked, a person or business with
notice of the block may not sell, transfer, or place the debt for collection.
6. You also may prevent businesses from reporting information about you to consumer
reporting agencies if you believe the information is a result of identity theft. To do
so, you must send your request to the address specified by the business that reports the
information to the consumer reporting agency. The business will expect you to identify
what information you do not want reported and to provide an identity theft report.
To learn more about identity theft and how to deal with its consequences, visit
www.consumer.gov/idtheft, or write to the FTC. You may have additional rights under state law.
For more information, contact your local consumer protection agency or your state attorney
general.
In addition to the new rights and procedures to help consumers deal with the effects of
identity theft, the FCRA has many other important consumer protections. They are described in
more detail at www.ftc.gov/credit.

Jon Said:

My WoW account's been hacked. Someone put an authenticator on it. Can they hack my credit card and bank stuff?

We Answered:

If they were able to steal your WoW account info, there's no reason they couldn't have stole every username and password you've entered into bank\CC websites to gain that info too. Also, if you've done any shopping online and entered your CC info, there's no reason they couldn't have grabbed that as well. Your Ad Here

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