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Providian Credit Card Application

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Debbie Said:

how do you get credit cards?

We Answered:

The short answer: Fill out an application and send it in.

Smart of you to ask before you got yourself in real trouble. A lot of people fill out the forst piece of junk mail that shows up and learn the hard way (I spent three times the amount I charged over six years with a Providian card-stay away from them).

Shop around, look for the best interest rates, and read the fine print, get recommendations. Sometimes your interest rates will sometimes go up if your payment gets in late, plus late fees, add to that the fact they send the bill late, anyway.

Glenda Said:

Please,what would you do?

We Answered:

Sounds like a classic case of identity theft. If you did not recieve a card, then someone found the application and changed the billing address and opened the account.

Contact the credit card company and notify them of the situation. If you get no result from them then you should contact the following to file a complaint.
Report the credit card issuer to the Comptroller of the Currency. Phone number is 202-874-4700.

Report the company to your state's attorney general's office. You can find links to your state's AG website at naag.org. Your state might allow you to file a complaint online. This is probably the most effective complaint to make as it is the attorney general's who have filed most of the lawsuits against credit card companies. For example, it was the California AG who sued Providian and forced them to pay the largest judgment against a credit card company ever.

Report the company to the Better Business Bureau. Submit your case for dispute resolution online at www.bbb.org.

Next, place a fraud alert on your credit reports to protect you from any further problems, here are the contact numbers
Equifax-800-685-1111
www.equifax.com

Experian-888-EXPERIAN (888-397-3742)
www.experian.com

TransUnion-800-916-8800
www.transunion.com

Next, go to the following web sites to find out how to resolve this problem. here is their link
http://www.consumer.gov/sentinel/
CONSUMER FRAUD AND IDENTITY THEFTS.
http://www.ftc.gov/credit
FTC WEB SITE

Hope this answers your question

Darrell Said:

How do you earn credit if no one gives you a chance?

We Answered:

You will not get the credit you think you deserve because you must first establish credit. I know a kid whose only bill was a cell phone. Guess what? He went delinquent on it. He has just put the first stain on his credit.

The only way to prove yourself is to accept the high interest rates now. Pay them on time all the time. Maintain your employment for as long as you can. If you change you job within the last year it will affect your interest rate and may even affect whether or not you are approved for credit. Keep in mind that creditors are looking to see what they can work with.
1. How much do you earn? In most case it must be over $12,000 USD.
2. How long you've worked at your present job? Should be better than a year.
3. How old your are? Over 24 is a better chance to get credit and lower interest rates
4. Do you own or pay rent? "Live with parents" doesn't impress a creditor.

If all the above are good answers then work on getting a secured credit card. There will be a lot of fees associated with a secured card such as application fee, annual fee, processing fee and late payment will be $25 and up, and your interest rate may be around 18 - 25%. Do this for a over a year. Make sure you actually use the credit card but dont ever max it.

Providian Bank may give you credit without money into a savings account but there interest rates will be up there. They start of low but every 6 month they increase as long as you've made timely payments.

Also get a loan. Have a family member cosign it. Your credit as well as their credit is affected. So as long as you make timely payment its a win win situation. You can't be denied an auto loan. Having and paying these loans and credit cards increase your credit score. Once you have these under your belt and your on the better side of items 1-4 stated above, you should be home free.

Good Luck

Annette Said:

what is a good first time credit card i can get?

We Answered:

Here's how I re-built my credit after having filed a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy (and no one would give me credit): I was sent an application from Capital One for a secured credit card. What they said is if I sent them $300, they would put it into a savings account and then set up a credit card for me with a $300 limit.

I then charged what I could afford to pay every month, which at the time was $200. Then when I got the bill I would pay it in full long before the due date (so I was never late), and then charge it up again.

I did this for 6 months. They then increased my credit limit to $500 (but did not ask for more money for the savings account). I continued to charge and payoff and after another 6 months they increased my limit to $1,000 and sent me the original $300 (plus interest) back, stating I was now approved for unsecured credit.

I checked my credit score which had been in the 400's after my Bankruptcy and it was now over 600. I then applied for more credit cards and was approved for them, and canceled my Capital One card. Incidentally, when I later applied to them for another card, they turned me down!

Be sure to stay away from Providian (if they are still called that). They once offered to send me an "unsecured" credit card with a $100 limit, if I paid them a $127.00 processing fee. Yeah, right.

George Said:

Can a collection agency sue me without sending proof of debt first?

We Answered:

Again, you should demand written validation per your rights under federal law. They have to provide written validation when you request this in writing. It's not an option.
===========================
When a debt collector first contacts you, your first step should always be to request validation of the debt per your rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Even if the debt is valid, request validation anyway.

Send them a letter via Certified Mail + Return Receipt (do not use regular mail) stating:

Per the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, I am requesting written validation of this alleged debt, including a copy of the original signed application with my signature
--------------------------------------…
* DO NOT sign your signature on any document that you mail to a debt collector. It could end up on a forged document that can be used against you. Simply type your full name.

When they call back, tell them: I have sent a certified letter to your office officially requesting written validation of this alleged debt per my rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. Per this federal law they must provide written validation within 30 days and they must cease collection activity until they send you written validation. Do not let them scare you with bogus threats during this period. This will give you breathing time to explore your options.
============================
- Providian was bought by Washington Mutual...which is now a part of Chase...
- They can sue if the debt is within the statute of limitations...and it certainly is being that the debt is from 2007
- Debt collectors love nothing more than to pretend to be (or represent) attorneys when this is not the case to scare people into paying them. This is a violation of federal law. If they threaten you with a lawsuit/legal action, then ask for their attorney’s full name and license number in the state bar association. Call your state bar association to confirm this info. If they refuse to give this info to you, then the legal threat is probably a bluff.
- By themselves, debt collectors have absolutely no legal power over you., they cannot garnish your wages or freeze checking accounts...only a court can authorize this and they’d have to go through the court system to do this.

Julio Said:

How many years later can a debt collector still try to collect?10-11 years later?

We Answered:

The Statute Of Limitations and your credit report are totally different from one another and has nothing to do with the length of time debt can stay on your credit report.

The law states: A consumer reporting company can report most accurate negative information for seven years and bankruptcy information for 10 years. There is no time limit on reporting information about criminal convictions; information reported in response to your application for a job that pays more than $75,000 a year; and information reported because you've applied for more than $150,000 worth of credit or life insurance. Information about a lawsuit or an unpaid judgment against you can be reported for seven years or until the statute of limitations runs out, whichever is longer.

What to do if you are contacted by a creditor and the debt expired under the Statute Of Limitations

The only thing you need to say to the collector is, "I have an absolute defense because under the Statute of Limitations, the debt has expired."

Just remember that The Statute of Limitations does not cause your debt to disappear after it has expires. If a creditor files a civil lawsuit, the person has an absolute defense to use against the creditor in court. They must present the new evidence in the court to avoid a potential judgment. You file the proper papers to the court to support the claim of a absolute defense. If the creditor tries to sue ,in a court of law and you do not prove to the court that the Statute of Limitations has expired, then you will have automatically lost lawsuit and a judgment will be issued against you.

Viola Said:

Credit Card Help!?

We Answered:

Well, you can do a search on "no credit credit cards" and it should bring some up, but don't confuse no credit with bad credit when applying because the bad credit cards are a real rip off. Just be careful of the ones that either want money up front, or will give you a $300 limit with a $100 application fee, $100 account maintenance fee, etc where your limit when you get the card is only $50 cause you owe them all of those fees. Also, don't apply for a bunch of cards right off the bat because that will make you look like a credit risk and the good companies will turn you down, not to mention it lowers your credit score having too many inquiries. Another thing, don't be fooled by someone saying you have to get one of those cards because it is the only way to get credit. I almost signed up for one of those ripoff cards when I turned 19 and when I changed my mind the lady asked me how else was I going to establish credit? A couple months later I applied for a card with Providian and was given a $1000 limit on my first card, with no previous credit history. Your Ad Here

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